Total Stations

In the collection there is a small group of total stations. Most total stations are hardly worth collecting; they are little innovative, instruments of low accuracy, and stop functioning sooner than their analogue counterparts: the theodolites.

Still a few have made it to the collection for various reasons. The 1984 Kern E1 is a nice example of an electronic theodolite that, by adding a DM503 electronic distance meter (EDM) and field book, could be converted into an actual total station. The 1980 Wild TC1 was one of the first to have a fully integrated and coaxial EDM and a fully digital data recorder (the very first total station, the Zeiss Reg Elta 14 used a punched paper tape for storage). The early 1980s saw the very first robotic total station: the SAT/SAGEM AGA-Minilir, which would soon be followed by one of the first purposely built robotic total stations: the Krupp Atlas PolarTrack. The end of the 1980s saw the advent of the software-driven total stations like the Geodimeter System 400. Finally to show the progress in technique by the end of the 20th century the 1999 Leica TCRA 1101 robotic total station was added, in those days the best total station money could buy.



If you have any questions and/or remarks please let me know.

1980 SAT/SAGEM AGA-Minilir.
Figure 1: 1980 SAT/SAGEM AGA-Minilir.
 
1980 Wild Heerbrugg Sercel TC1 tachymat.
Figure 2: 1980 Wild Heerbrugg Sercel TC1 tachymat.

1984 Kern E1 DM503 electronic theodolite.
Figure 3: 1984 Kern E1 DM503 electronic theodolite.
 
1986 Geodimeter System 400.
Figure 4: 1986 Geodimeter System 400.

1992 Krupp Atlas PolarTrack
Figure 5: 1992 Krupp Atlas PolarTrack
 
1999 Leica TCRA robotic total station.
Figure 6: 1999 Leica TCRA robotic total station.

Surveyor's crosses Geodetic Sextants Theodolites Total Stations Levels Standards Tools Firms
1980 SAT AGA-Minilir 1980 Wild TC1 1984 Kern E1 1986 Geodimeter System 400 1992 Krupp Atlas PolarTrack 1999 Leica TCRA 1101